Recommended Reading

by Race in the Workplace special correspondent Erica

Minority Workers Less Likely to Say Promotions Are Based on Merit - HR.BLR.com (Business & Legal Reports)
61.4% of all employees, 56.6% of Hispanic respondents, and 58.2% of black respondents said they thought their job performance was the main reason for their professional advancement. That doesn’t seem significant to me and speaks to larger issues: it’s as much who you know as what you know and there’s a systemic issue of lack of trust in one’s employer. (via Strategic HR Lawyer)

Paradox of Inclusion - Management Craft
There are two kinds of inclusion. There’s the politically correct kind where you make a show of inviting along a “representative” group to your meeting du jour and you “listen” to what they have to say and then go ahead and do what you were going to do anyway. Then there’s the kind where you actually listen to the voices of the people around you, even (and especially) when you might not agree with them.

Where Delivery Is a Mainstay, a Rebellion Over Pay - New York Times
Deliverymen in NYC, mostly Chinese immigrants, are protesting their working conditions, long hours, and meager pay. Unions are organizing, workers are getting locked out, and lawsuits are being filed.

Is It a Mistake to Be a Stay-at-Home Mother? - The Monster Blog
“[T]he more pressing question is not whether mothers should work (more than 70 percent of mothers with school-age children do), but how we can structure our society in a way to allow us to meet our caregiving needs. We, as men and women, bear some responsibility in that mandate, both to instill change within our organizations and within our own lives.” I’d like to see a discussion actually address this statement and go beyond “I stayed at home and it worked out for us” which further perpetuates the concept that you have to make a choice (and a sacrifice). Flex time, anyone?

LinkedIn and the Art of Avoiding an Asshole Boss - How to Change the World
How to get references on a potential boss. Guy Kawasaki suggests finding him/her on LinkedIn, seeing who they’re connected to, then asking these potential references a few questions. I appreciate the idea that you need to check out a potential employer as much as they’re checking you out. The comments on Guy’s post are mostly useless, but there are a few good constructive criticisms.

Churners and Churning - Generations@Work
Kids these days, the “Millennials,” are increasingly open to more global job opportunities. Which is good because that’s where the jobs are. The conflict is that younger folks are also a lot more likely to change jobs more frequently while employers and the government are looking to improve retention, which may be unrealistic given the nature of the current job market.

Wisdom and a Helping Hand - Amy Joyce at washingtonpost.com
On the importance of being a good mentor. The very large company I used to work for had very well-developed mentorship programs serving a variety of populations within the company. I participated in the “new minority employees” program and the “new technical employees” program. Mentors were very carefully screened and a lot of attention was paid to the matching process. These programs were crucial in my development there, and in my ultimate decision to leave, which I consider a testament to a good mentor/mentee relationship in that the best decision for me as a person was to not stay with the company, and my mentors were supportive of that.

How to ask for mentoring - Brazen Careerist
On the flip side of the mentoring relationship. Penelope Trunk emphasizes that it’s all in the approach. Ask good questions of your potential mentor. More importantly, don’t be afraid to ask in the first place.

Georgetown Gets Grant for Workplace Flexibility - Workplace Prof Blog
“Workplace Flexibility 2010 believes that social change occurs best through a combination of voluntary action and government action. The American workplace is a complex, constantly changing, and rich human environment. We believe the best policy approach to workplace flexibility therefore combines thoughtful and creative government regulation, robust voluntary and individualized efforts by employers and employees, and governmental support of innovative employer and employee efforts.” Outstanding!

Fear Of Firing - BusinessWeek
“How the threat of litigation is making companies skittish about axing problem workers.” There are several issues: Whether the employee really is an underperformer, whether or not they really are being discriminated against, and whether the company retaliates when they get wind of the discrimination allegation. Even the largest companies with the most rigorous policies and review processes get caught up in seemingly frivolous lawsuits.

Recommended Reading is a weekly feature where we link to some of our favorite workplace-related blog posts and articles. If you would like to suggest a link to Erica, please email tips@raceintheworkplace.com

Recommended Reading

by Race in the Workplace special correspondent Erica

Measuring the Gender Gap - New York Times
According to this study from Elle magazine and MSNBC.com, most women would still rather work for a man, most women still feel like they need to work harder than men to get the same recognition, and men are honing those “feminine skills” of listening and communication. Also in the article: the one occupation where it pays to be less attractive is babysitting (when it’s the mom that’s doing the hiring).

Too Busy to Notice You’re Too Busy - New York Times
Edward M. Hallowell’s new book, CrazyBusy: Overstretched, Overbooked and About to Snap, talks about our compulsive need to fill our time. In short, it’s our need to maintain control over the near-constant influx of information, even though we’re ultimately not in control of it at all if we’re constantly responding to it. I stopped in the middle of writing this paragraph to answer the e-mail ding and to Twitter something.

Discriminating Dress - Washington Post
A Muslim woman tells the story of her interviewers’ noticeable reaction to her head scarf. “General religious discrimination charges made up 1.9 percent of all charges filed in 1992, while they accounted for 3.1 percent in 2004, according to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. The number of charges filed by Muslims alleging discrimination doubled from the four years before the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks to the four years after, according to David Grinberg, a spokesman with the EEOC.”

How We Grow Bullies and Bad People - Management Craft
Inspired by the Kathy Sierra cyberbullying situation. One way we, as a society, let this happen is by letting racist jokes go unchecked. More generally, we really enjoy our schadenfraude and let ourselves be entertained by things that we ought to be putting a stop to instead.

The Debate Heats Up - Generations@Work
Russ Eckel starts out with this question: “Are young people today more narcissistic and thus more likely to find it difficult to participate constructively in our society as they age?” He goes on to talk about how prejudices against minority youth confound the issue.

EEOC Initiative to Eradicate Racism - Strategic HR Lawyer
The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission is launching an initiative called E-RACE (Eradicating Racism And Colorism from Employment). According to the EEOC, 31% of Asian-Americans and 26% of African-Americans have reported witnessing or experiencing discrimination in the workplace.

Recruiting and Presenting Immigrant Candidates - The Desk of Yvonne LaRose, Consultant
Yvonne LaRose reflects on the topic of how so many people come to this country with big credentials and big dreams, and what they actually end up doing once they get here to get by.

Not enough visas? 150K Applications in One Day - WageSlave
150,000 H-1B visas for immigrants were allotted for 2008. They were all distributed within a day, in record time.

Recommended Reading is a weekly feature where we link to some of our favorite workplace-related blog posts and articles. If you would like to suggest a link to Erica, please email tips@raceintheworkplace.com.

How to turn your ethnicity into a competitive edge

by Race in the Workplace special correspondent Adina Ba

Kenneth Arroyo Roldan is the CEO of Wesley, Brown & Bartle (WB&B), one of the nation’s leading executive search firms dedicated to the recruitment, retention and professional development of women and people of color. He is also author of the book Minority Rules: Turn Your Ethnicity Into a Competitive Edge.

Roldan’s advice is unique because he gives specific responsibility to the individual, instead of putting a vague blame on employers. It obviously takes work from both employer and employee to ensure a positive work experience. Roldan’s career planning advice is not only useful for people of color, but should be acknowledged as solid information for anyone looking to advance his or her career, regardless of race.

Take responsibility for where you are in your career and don’t be a bystander in your potential growth. Roldan’s no. 1 tip is: Find a trustworthy mentor to help guide you through the corporate world.

Which departments should people of color look out for that may hinder their chances to climb the corporate ladder?

Based on my experience on the front-lines, the following roles should be avoided like the plague:

  • Chief Diversity Officer/ Diversity Manager
  • Ethnic Marketing
  • Public Finance
  • Community Relations
  • Supplier Diversity

However, be mindful if you are positioned in this role – make sure you hit and move. Do your tour of duty and while doing so plan an exit strategy.

How can people of color rise through the ranks while maintaining their identities and not assimilating completely into a white male dominated culture?

People of color can absolutely rise up the ranks and simultaneously retain their identity. Minority Rules highlights several high performers like Mary Winston, Al Zollar or Carlos Valle – all of which made it to the top, have proudly self-identified internally within their organizations and have been integral in positioning program and projects that benefited people of color.

What steps should a minority employee take when they feel they are not being treated as fairly as their co-workers?

First pearl of wisdom: don’t do the knee-jerk reaction and initiate a lawsuit. Those professionals who have internal challenges should speak to their mentor/sponsor and gain their counsel; thereafter you should speak to your supervisor, then to HR. In the event you receive no satisfaction, start planning your exit strategy.

You write that minority job seekers should do their homework to find out which corporations are sincerely open to diversity. Do you have advice on how to research which corporations really stand up to the test? Should job seekers go directly to company websites, are there other resources?

Research, research, research. The benefits available due to the internet is immense. There are various websites like Vault.com which often give prospective employees intelligence about a company. The company websites are a primer but will never shed true-light about a company. I am a proponent of relying on your alumni network to gain company intelligence.

Once a company promotes that their hiring practices are fair and open to minority applicants, how can all levels of the organization stay committed to the policy?

Let’s face it — most if not all of the Fortune 500 promote that their hiring practices are fair and open to minority applicants – they have to, it’s the law!!!! However, despite organizations articulating they are committed to the policy – particularly the CEO and his/her senior executives – by the time it trickles down the organization, the message [can] always fall on deaf ears.

For more information

Click the play button below to hear Carmen’s interview with Kenneth Arroyo Roldan on episode 53 (December 25, 2006) of New Demographic’s weekly podcast, Addicted to Race:

You can find more Race in the Workplace interviews in our archives.